Make your own fountain

Since I moved back to California, whenever I go out on an archaeological project I usually grab an interesting or cool looking rock for the Dashing Son. I have been collecting this rocks for four years, and was trying to figure out how display these rocks. I figured that a fountain would be a neat way to show them off, especially since they look better wet.

During the early days when Dashing Daughter was sleeping a lot, I attempted to make a fountain out of concrete. I made forms, and poured the concrete, and it was a complete, 1100 pound failure. It leaked because I used the wrong type of mesh for reinforcement.

Anyway, after looking on Pinterest for Do-it yourself fountains (Okay, the Dashing Wife looked at Pinterest), we saw some interesting ideas using large ceramic pots. A local gardening supply place was having a sale so we went down there and grabbed some pots.

We got three pots of varying sizes, plus some plate bases, a solar powered pump (I bought that on Amazon), and some pot plugging goop.  The solar pump I bought produces 1600 mAH of power and also came with a back up battery, so we can get some water feature action in the evening.

Several of the Pinterest boards said to drill holes and run pipe, but by using the solar power, I didn’t have to drill holes, and I did something else to avoid running pipe.

The first step was figure out where I was going to put the fountain, so that I can get the solar panel in a good sunny spot.

The solar panel on the roof.

The solar panel on the roof.

Then I took the pot plugging goop and plugged the holes in the two larger pots. The goop is like chewing gum and you just jam it into the hole. Note: I had some issues with the bottom pot leaking a bit, and put in some epoxy.

Using the pot plugging goop to plug the drain hole in the pots.

Using the pot plugging goop to plug the drain hole in the pots.

I placed the bottom pot in a spot by my back door and the window by my breakfast nook. I had a couple of extra pots that I bought at Costco that I was going to use to support the plate bases. But they were too short, so I uses some bricks in the bottom of the pretty pots to lift them up higher.

So bricks,

Bricks in base of the first pot

Bricks in base of the first pot

then cheap pot,

The cheap pot on top of the bricks in the base pot

The cheap pot on top of the bricks in the base pot

then plate base,

Setting the base plate on the cheap pot

Setting the base plate on the cheap pot

and then set the next pretty pot on the base. Repeat these steps for the second pot.

Put the second pot onto the base plate.

Put the second pot onto the base plate.

The third pot had a bit of a flaw on it, so I decided to set it on its side.

The flaw in the top pot (resting on top of the second base plate)

The flaw in the top pot (resting on top of the second base plate)

I used some of the pot plugging goop to partially plug the small pot. I put the fountain head through goop, and ran some tubing down to the bottom pot.

The plastic tube up the back of the fountain

The plastic tube up the back of the fountain

Then I connected the solar powered pump to the fountain head.  I should say that the solar pump does not produce as much of a spray like a plugged in pump would. But for this water feature it works just fine.

The fountain working and spraying away.

The fountain working and spraying away.

To finalize everything, I put rocks in the upper pot and on the upper plate base. I would have put some rocks in the bottom plate base, but the Dashing Daughter thought that splashing the water was a lot of fun, and we figured that giving her access to rocks next to a window.

Dashing Daughter splashing away

Dashing Daughter splashing away

The completed fountain (well, without the rocks on the bottom)

The completed fountain (well, without the rocks on the bottom)

So that is the rock fountain for Dashing Son. It was pretty easy to do, and if you can find some inexpensive pots at Big Lots, Costco, or wherever you can, you can build it pretty cheap.

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